MATERIAL SAFETY DATASHEET

MSDS-2
March 27, 2013
(845)-651-6600

ZIRCAR Ceramics, Inc.
P.O. Box 519
Florida, NY 10921

1. Product Identification

Trade Name: Alumina - Silica Products Chemical Name: Mixture

Group 1

Synonym: Alumina-Silica Ceramic Fiber Blanket Molecular Formula: Al2O3, SiO2
Types: ASB-2300, ASB-2600

Group 2

Synonym: Alumina-Silica Ceramic Fiber Product Molecular Formula: Al2O3, SiO2
Types: ASQ, ASH

Group 3

Synonym: Alumina-Silica Ceramic Fiber Product Molecular Formula: Al2O3, SiO2
Types: HASH-30, HASH-60

Group 4

Synonym: Alumina-Silica Ceramic Fiber Product Molecular Formula: Al2O3, SiO2
Types: AXL, AXHTM, ECO-1200B, NKO, NKO-2, RNKO, UNIFORM A1, UNIFORM A2, UNIFORM C1, UNIFORM C2

Group 5

Synonym: Alumina-Silica Ceramic Fiber Product Molecular Formula: Al2O3, SiO2
Types: ECO-27B, Z-290, Z-450, Z-500

Group 6

Synonym: Alumina-Silica Cement Molecular Formula: Al2O3, SiO2
Types: AS-CEM

Group 7

Synonym: Alumina-Silica Ceramic Fiber Product Molecular Formula: Al2O3, SiO2
Types: ECO-1200A, ECO-27A

Group 8

Synonym: Alumina-Silica Ceramic Fiber Textile Molecular Formula: Al2O3, SiO2
Types: AS-1260, ASBF, ASBF-1

Group 9

Synonym: Alumina-Silica Ceramic Fiber Paste Molecular Formula: Al2O3, SiO2
Types: AX Moldable  

Group 10

Synonym: Alumina-Silica Ceramic Fiber Paper Molecular Formula: Al2O3, SiO2
Type: CTP-1  

2. Composition / Information on Ingredients

Component

Molecular Formula

CAS Number

Alumina

Al2O3

1344-28-1

Silica (amorphous)

SiO2

7631-86-9

Silica ( cristobalite )

SiO2

14464-46-1

Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous)

Al2O3, SiO2

142844-00-6

Ethylene Glycol

C2H4(OH)2

107-21-1

Polyethylene Oxide

N/A

25322-68-3

Starch

N/A

9005-25-8

Acrylic Latex

N/A

Mixture

Groups from Section One Components % by Weight
Groups 1& 8 Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous) 100
Group 2 Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous) 75 - 80
Alumina 20 - 25
Group 3 Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous) 65
Alumina 35
Group 4 Silica (amorphous) 50 - 75
Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous) 25 - 50
Group 5 Silica (amorphous) 20 - 30
Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous) 40 - 60
Alumina 25 - 35
Group 6 Silica (amorphous)

10 - 15

Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous) 40 - 60
Group 7 Silica (amorphous) 20 - 30
Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous) 40 - 60
Starch 5 - 10
Group 9 Silica (amorphous) 25 - 30
Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous) 20 - 25
Ethylene Glycol 3 - 5
Polyethylene Oxide 1 - 2
Group 10 Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous) 85 - 95
Acrylic Latex 5-15

Exposure Guidelines

Aluminum Oxide

OSHA PEL as 8 hr TWA

5/15 mg/m3 Total dust/Respirable Fraction

ACGIH PEL as 8 hr TWA

10 mg/m3 Inhalable particulate with no asbestos and <1% crystalline silica

Canadian PEL as TWA

5 mg/m3

Carcinogenicity by ACGIH

Group A4, Not classifiable as a human carcinogen

Silica (amorphous)

OSHA PEL as 8 hr TWA

20 mppcfa, 80 mg/m3

NIOSH PEL as 8 hr TWA

6 mg/m3

Canadian PEL as TWA

2/5 mg/m3 Total mass/Respirable Mass

ILDH Level by SCPC

3000 mg/m3

Carcinogenicity by ACGIH

Group 3

Silica (cristobalite)

OSHA PEL as 8 hr TWA

0.05 mg/m3

ACGIH PEL as 8 hr TWA

0.05 mg/m3

Carcinogenicity by ACGIH

Y

Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous) - RCF

Refractory Ceramic Fiber Coalition (RCFC)

0.5 fibers/cc

ACGIH

0.5 fibers/cc

OSHA

0.5 fibers/cc

Starch

OSHA PEL as 8 hr TWA

5 mg/m (resp. dust) 15 mg/m (total dust)

ACGIH

10 mg/m

Ethylene Glycol

ACGIH PEL as 8 hr TWA

5 ppm (vapor) CL

Acrylic Latex

OSHA

None established

ACGIH

None established

3. Hazard Identification

Emergency Overview
Warning! Possible Cancer Hazard By Inhalation. May Cause Skin, Eye, And Respiratory Tract Irritation. Hazard Depends On Duration And Level Of Exposure. White Odorless Bulk Fibers.
TARGET ORGANS: Skin, eyes, and lungs
CAUTION: Handling or machining of these products may produce respirable dust particles. Dust may irritate eyes, skin respiratory tract.
Inhalation If inhaled in sufficient quantity, may cause respiratory tract irritation. Symptoms may include scratchiness of the nose or throat, cough or chest discomfort.
Eye Contact Slightly to moderately irritating. Fibers may be abrasive; prolonged contact may cause damage to the outer surface of the eye.
Skin Contact Slightly to moderately irritating. Exposure may result in irritation, inflammation, rash or itching.
Ingestion If ingested in sufficient quantity, may cause gastrointestinal disturbances. Symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain.
Chronic Effects Studies to date, involving occupationally exposed workers, have not identified any increased incidence of respiratory disease. Long-term, high-dose exposure to specially-sized, rodent respirable fiber has resulted in the development of fibrosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma in rats & hamsters. See Sections 11 & 16 of this MSDS for more information.
Medical Conditions Aggravated by Exposure: Pre-existing medical conditions, including dermatitis, asthma or chronic lung disease may be aggravated by exposure; individuals who are atopic (with a history of allergies) may experience greater amounts of skin and respiratory irritation.

Hazard Classification

Although studies, involving occupationally exposed workers, have not identified any increased incidence of respiratory disease, results from animal testing have been used as the basis for hazard classification.

The Seventh Annual Report on Carcinogens (1994), prepared by the National Toxicology Program (NTP), classified respirable RCF and glasswool as substances reasonably anticipated to be carcinogens.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified ceramic fiber, fibrous glasswool and mineral wool (rockwool & slagwool) as possible human carcinogens (Group 2b) based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in animals, but insufficient data in humans.

The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) has classified RCF as "A2-Suspected Human Carcinogen."

The State of California, pursuant to Proposition 65, The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, has listed "ceramic fibers (airborne fibers of respirable size)" as known to the State of California to cause cancer.

The Commission of The European Communities (DG XI) has classified RCF as a substance which should be regarded as if is carcinogenic to man.

The Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) has listed RCF as "probably carcinogenic" (Group 2).

The Canadian Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) RCF is classified as Class D2A Materials Causing Other Toxic Effects.

The Hazardous Materials Identification System (HMIS)-

Groups from Section One

Health

Flammability

Physical Hazard

Groups 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 9 1* 0 0
Group 7, 8 and 10 1* 1 0

Note: * denotes potential for chronic effects.

4. First Aid Measures

Inhalation: If respiratory tract irritation occurs, relocate individual to a dust free environment. Get medical attention if irritation persists. See Section 8 for additional measures to reduce or eliminate exposure.

Eye Contact: If eyes become irritated, flush immediately with large amounts of lukewarm water for at least 15 minutes. Eyelids should be held away from the eyeball to ensure thorough rinsing. Do not rub eyes. Get medical attention if irritation persists.

Skin Contact: If skin becomes irritated, remove contaminated clothing. Do not rub or scratch exposed skin. Wash area of contact thoroughly with soap and water. Using a skin cream or lotion after washing may be helpful.

Ingestion: If gastrointestinal irritation occurs, relocate individual to a dust free environment. Seek medical attention if symptoms persist.

Note to Physicians: Skin and respiratory effects are the result of mechanical irritation; fiber exposure does not result in allergic manifestations.

5. Fire Fighting Measures

NFPA Unusual Hazards: None

Autoignition Temperature: None.

Flammable Properties:

Flashpoint: None. Method: Not Applicable

Flammable Limits: Lower Flammable Limit and Upper Flammable Limit: Not Applicable.

Extinguishing Media:Use extinguishing media suitable for type of surrounding fire.

Hazardous Decomposition Products: None.

Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazard: None.

6. Accidental Release Measures

Spill Procedures: Dust suppressing cleaning methods such as wet sweeping or vacuuming should be used to clean the work area. If vacuuming is used the vacuum must be equipped with a HEPA filter. Compressed air or dry sweeping should not be used for cleaning. Dust suppressing compounds may be used to clean up light dust. Use wet sweeping or a dust suppressant where sweeping is necessary.

7. Handling and Storage

Storage: These materials are stable and may be stored in a dry place indefinitely. Physical abrasion may produce small amounts of respirable dusts. Liquid and moist products (groups 6 & 9) should be stored in a sealed container. See precautions under section 8.

Normal Use: Handle ceramic fiber with caution. Minimize airborne dusts by avoiding the unnecessary disturbance of materials.

Machining and Cutting: These materials may produce respirable dust when machined or cut. See section 8 for exposure controls and personal protection during machining or installation procedures.

High Temperature Conditions: Service significantly above the product design temperature may increase friability and the possibility of generating airborne fibers or particulates. While not considered problematic during use, airborne fibers may complicate removal activities. It is recommended that product use be carefully matched to design parameters.

After Service: As manufactured these products contain an aluminosilicate which may transform upon heating (temperatures greater than 1000oc for extended periods of time) to non-hazardous mullite and cristobalite (CAS # 14464-46-1), a form of crystalline silica. Prolonged or repeated inhalation of respirable free crystalline silica dust may cause delayed lung injury (silicosis). The IARC has classified crystalline silica as group 2A, probable human carcinogen. There is sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in animals, but limited evidence in humans. OSHA's final rule limit and ACGIH'S tlv for respirable cristobalite is .05 mg/m3 . Product removal must consider the possibility of usage above design temperatures. See section 8 for appropriate respiratory protection during removal.

Prolonged exposure to high temperatures generally increases the relative friability of aluminosilicate fibers. Removal and clean up of after-service product may result in exposure to a mixture of crystalline phase silica and vitreous aluminosilicate fiber (see Section 16 for more details). Depending on the product's use, other contaminants may also be present. During removal, the exposed material should be frequently misted with water to minimize airborne dust. A surfactant may be added to the water to improve the wetting process. Use only enough water to wet the insulation. Do not allow water to accumulate on floors.

8. Exposure Controls / Personal Protection

Component

OSHA (PEL)

ACGIH TLV

ZIRCAR Ceramics, Inc.

Aluminosilicate fiber (vitreous)

None established*

None established

0.5 fiber/cc, 8-hr. TWA**

 

* There is no specific regulatory standard for RCF in the U.S. OSHA's "Particulate Not Otherwise Regulated (PNOR)" standard [29 CFR 1910.1000, Subpart Z, Air Contaminants] applies generally; Total Dust 15 mg/m; Respirable Fraction 5 mg/m.

 

** The Refractory Ceramic Fibers Coalition (RCFC) has sponsored comprehensive toxicology and epidemiology studies to identify potential RCF-related health effects [see Section 11 for more details], consulted experts familiar with fiber and particle science, conducted a thorough review of the RCF-related scientific literature, and further evaluated the data in a state-of-the-art quantitative risk assessment. Based on these efforts and in the absence of an OSHA PEL, RCFC has adopted a recommended exposure guideline, as measured under NIOSH Method 7400 B. The manufacturers' REG is intended to promote occupational health and safety through prudent exposure control and reduction and it reflects relative technical and economic feasibility as determined by extensive industrial hygiene monitoring efforts undertaken pursuant to an agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

OTHER OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE LEVELS (OEL)
RCF-related occupational exposure limits vary internationally. Regulatory OEL examples include: Australia 0.5 f/cc; Austria 0.5 f/cc; Canada 0.5 to 1.0 f/cc; Denmark 1.0 f/cc; France 0.6 f/cc; Germany 0.5 f/cc; Netherlands 1.0 f/cc; New Zealand 1.0 f/cc; Norway 2.0 f/cc; Poland 2.0 f/cc; Sweden 1.0 f/cc; United Kingdom 2.0 f/cc. Non-regulatory OEL examples include: ACGIH TLV 0.2 f/cc; RCFC REG 0.5 f/cc. The objectives and criteria underlying each of these OEL decisions also vary. The evaluation of occupational exposure limits and determining their relative applicability to the workplace is best performed, on a case-by-case basis, by a qualified Industrial Hygienist.

Engineering Controls: Dust suppressing control technologies such as local exhaust ventilation, point of generation dust collection, down draft work stations, emission controlling tool designs, and materials handling equipment are effective means of minimizing airborne fiber emissions. For additional information, contact the Product Stewardship Information Hotline (See Section 16).

Respiratory Protection: When engineering and/or administrative controls are insufficient, the use of appropriate respiratory protection, pursuant to the requirements of OSHA 1910.134 AND 29 CFR 1926.103, is recommended. The following information is provided as an example of appropriate respiratory protection for aluminosilicate fibers. The evaluation of workplace hazards and the identification of appropriate respiratory protection is best performed, on a case-by-case basis, by a qualified Industrial Hygienist.

Recommended Respiratory Protection (When Handling RCF)

Respirable Airborne Fiber Concentration1

Respirator Recommendation2,3,4

Less than 0.5 f/cc

No specific recommendation. User preference based upon conditions present

0.5 f/cc to 5.0 f/cc

Half-face, air purifying respirator equipped with a P-100 filter cartridge

5.0 f/cc to 25 f/cc

Full-facepiece, air purifying respirator equipped with a P-100 filter cartridge

More than 25 f/cc

Full-facepiece, positive pressure supplied air respirator

1Concentrations based upon an eight hour time weighted average (TWA) as determined by air samples collected and analyzed pursuant to NIOSH method 7400 (B) for airborne fibers.

2During furnace tear-out activities after-service RCF removals, the manufacturer recommends, at a minimum, the use of full-facepiece air purifying respirator equipped with a P-100 filter cartridge to control fiber exposure.

3In the absence of other objective data or when concentrations are unknown, the manufacturer recommends the use of half-face, air purifying respirator equipped with a P-100 filter cartridge.

4Situations involving a potential exposure to airborne contaminants should be evaluated by a qualified industrial hygienist for the selection of appropriate respiratory protection and air monitoring.

Skin Protection: Wear gloves, head coverings and full body clothing as necessary to prevent skin irritation. Washable or disposable clothing may be used. If possible, do not take unwashed clothing home. Work clothes should be washed separately from other clothing and the washing machine rinsed thoroughly following use. Inform the launderer of the proper procedures.

Eye Protection: Wear safety glasses or chemical goggles to prevent eye contact. Do not wear contact lenses unless chemical goggles are also worn. Do not touch eyes with soiled body parts or materials. Have eye washing facilities readily available where eye contact can occur

9. Physical/Chemical Properties

=

Form

Appearance

Odor

Solubility in H2O

Group 1

Ceramic fiber blankets and paper

White

Odorless

Insoluble

Groups 2, 3 & 4

Rigid ceramic fiber shapes

White

Odorless

Insoluble

Group 5

Rigid insulation shapes

Tan

Odorless

Insoluble

Group 6

Viscous liquid

White

Odorless

Insoluble

Group 7

Rigid ceramic fiber shapes with organic bond

White to Tan

Odorless

Organic binder will dissolve

Group 8

Ceramic fiber textiles

White to Off-white

Odorless

Insoluble

Group 9

Sticky paste

Off-white

Odorless

N/A

 

S. G.

Melting Point

Vapor Pressure

% Volatile

PH

Group 1 & 8

2.73

>1760oC (3200oF)

N/A

0

N/A

Groups 2, 3, 4 & 5

0.19-0.32

>1793oC (3260oF)

N/A

0

N/A

Group 6

ND

>1760oC (3200oF), dried

N/A

30 wt. % H2O

N/A

Group 7

2.6

>1760oC(3200oF)

N/A

5 wt. % H2O

N/A

Group 9

ND

>1760oC(3200oF)

ND

40-45 wt.% H2O

N/A

10. Stability and Reactivity

Stability: Materials are stable.

Chemical Incompatibilities: Soluble in hydrofluoric acid, phosphoric acid, and concentrated alkali.

Hazardous Decomposition Products: None.

Hazardous polymerization: Not Applicable.

11. Toxicology

There has been no increased incidence of respiratory disease or other significant health effects in occupationally exposed workers. In animal studies, long-term, high-dose inhalation exposure resulted in the development of respiratory disease in rats and hamsters.

EPIDEMIOLOGY

The University of Cincinnati is conducting an ongoing epidemiologic investigation. The evidence obtained from employees in U. S. RCF manufacturing facilities is as follows:

1) There is no evidence of any fibrotic lung disease (interstitial fibrosis) from evaluations of chest X-rays.

2) There is no evidence of an elevated incidence of lung disease among RCF manufacturing employees.

3) An early statistical "trend" was observed, in the exposed population, between RCF exposure duration and some measures of lung function. The observations were clinically insignificant. If these observations were made on an individual employee, the results would be interpreted as being within the normal (predicted) respiratory range. A more recent longitudinal study of employees with 5 or more pulmonary function tests found that there was no effect on lung function associated with RCF production experience.

4) Pleural plaques (thickening along the chest wall) have been observed in a small number of RCF employees. The best evidence to date indicates that pleural plaques are a marker of exposure only. Under most circumstances, pleural plaques are not associated with pulmonary impairment. The pathogenesis of pleural plaques remains incompletely understood; however, the mechanism appears to be an inflammatory response caused by inhaled fibers.

5) Initial data (circa 1987) seemed to indicate an interactive effect between smoking and RCF exposure; more recent data, however, found no interactive effect. Nevertheless, to promote good health, RCF employees are still actively encouraged not to smoke.

TOXICOLOGY

A number of toxicological studies designed to identify any potential health effects from RCF exposure have been completed. In one study, conducted by the Research and Consulting Company, (Geneva, Switzerland), rats and hamsters were exposed to 30 mg/m (about 200 fibers/cc) of specially-prepared RCF for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week, for up to 24 months. In rats, a statistically significant increase in lung tumors was observed; two mesotheliomas (cancer of the pleural lining between the chest wall and lung) were also identified. Hamsters did not develop lung tumors; however, interstitial fibrosis and mesothelioma was found. Some, in the scientific community, have concluded that the "maximum tolerated dose" was exceeded and that significant particle contamination was a confounding issue; therefore, these study findings may not represent an accurate assessment of the potential for RCF to produce adverse health effects.

In a related multi-dose study with a similar protocol, other rats were exposed to doses of 16 mg/m, 9 mg/m, 3 mg/m which corresponds to about 115, 75, and 25 fibers per cubic centimeter respectively. This study found no statistically significant increase in lung cancer. Some cases of pleural and parenchymal fibrosis were seen in the 16 mg/m dose group. Some cases of mild fibrosis and one mesothelioma were observed in the 9 mg/m group. No acute respiratory effects were seen in the rats in the 3 mg/m exposure group, which suggests that there may be a dose/response threshold, below which irreversible respiratory impacts do not occur.

Other toxicological studies have been conducted which utilized non-physiological exposure methods such as intrapleural, intraperitoneal and intratracheal implantation or injection. Some of these studies have found that RCF is a potential carcinogen. Some experts, however, suggest that these tests have limited relevance because they bypass many of the biological mechanisms that prevent fiber deposition or facilitate fiber clearance.

To obtain more epidemiology or toxicology information, please call the telephone number for the Product Stewardship Program found in Section 16 - Other Information.

12. Ecological Information

Ecotoxicological Information: No ecological concerns have been identified.

Chemical Fate Information: The relative inertness of these material indicate that they may be highly persistent in the environment. No information regarding any negative effects of this persistence has been noted.

13. Disposal Information

Disposal: Consult with local, state and federal regulations. In most cases these materials may be landfilled safely.

Hazardous Waste Classification: Not listed as a RCRA Hazardous waste (40 CFR 261.31). Not listed under SARA, CERCLA, or the Clean Air Act. Any processing, use, alteration or chemical additions to the product, as purchased, may alter the disposal requirements. Under Federal regulations, it is the waste generator's responsibility to properly characterize a waste material, to determine if it is a "hazardous" waste.

Empty Containers: Empty containers may contain product dust or residue. Do not re-use.

14. Transportation Information

Not regulated hazardous substances, no specific regulations apply.

15. Regulatory Information

Key statutory and regulatory classifications or listings for the product, as manufactured, which may impact product storage, use, handling or disposal:

U.S. FEDERAL REGULATIONS

EPA: Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III - This product does not contain any substances reportable under Sections 302, 304, 313, (40 CFR 372). Sections 311 and 312 (40 CFR 370) apply (delayed hazard).
Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) - All substances in this product are listed, as required, on the TSCA inventory. RCF has been assigned a CAS number; however, it is a simple mixture and therefore not required to be listed on the TSCA inventory. The components of RCF are listed on the inventory.
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Clean Air Act (CAA) - RCF contains fibers with an average diameter greater than one micron and thus is not considered a hazardous air pollutant.

OSHA: Comply with Hazard Communication Standards 29 CFR 1910.1200 and 29 CFR 1926.59 and the Respiratory Protection Standards 29 CFR 1910.134 and 29 CFR 1926.103.

California: Ceramic fibers (airborne particles of respirable size)" is listed in Proposition 65, The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 as a chemical known to the State of California to cause cancer.

Other States: RCF products are not known to be regulated by states other than California; however, state and local OSHA and EPA regulations may apply to these products. If in doubt, contact your local regulatory agency.

INTERNATIONAL REGULATIONS

Canada: Canadian Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) RCF is classified as Class D2A Materials Causing Other Toxic Effects
Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) - All substances in this product are listed, as required, on the Domestic Substance List (DSL)

European Union: European Directive 97/69/EC classified RCF as a Category 2 carcinogen; that is it "should be regarded as if it is carcinogenic to man."

16. Other

After-Service RCF Removal

As manufactured, RCF products are vitreous aluminosilicates which do not contain respirable crystalline silica. However, following sustained, high temperature (>1800F) use, it is possible for portions of the exposed RCF to devitrify into mullite or crystalline phase silica (cristobalite or quartz). Chronic exposure to respirable crystalline silica may lead to lung disease. IARC has concluded that: "Crystalline silica inhaled in the form of quartz or cristobalite from occupational sources is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1)" [IARC Monograph 68, June 1997, p. 210-211]. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has adopted a permissible exposure limit (PEL) for respirable cristobalite at 0.05 mg/m. When needed, the use of proper exposure controls and respiratory protection is recommended to reduce potential health risks and to ensure compliance with OSHA requirements. The evaluation of workplace hazards and the identification of appropriate respiratory protection is best performed, on a case-by-case basis, by a qualified Industrial Hygienist. For more detailed information regarding respirable crystalline silica, call the Product Stewardship Information Hotline (see below).

Product Stewardship Program

The RCFC member companies have established a program to provide customers with up-to-date information regarding the proper use and handling of refractory ceramic fiber. In addition RCFC member companies have also established a program to monitor airborne fiber concentrations at customer facilities. If you would like more information about this program, please call the Product Stewardship Information Hotline.

Definitions:

ACGIH: American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists
CAS: Chemical Abstracts Service
EPA: Environmental Protection Agency
f/cc: Fibers per cubic centimeter
HEPA: High Efficiency Particulate Air
HMIS: Hazardous Materials Information System
mg/m: Milligrams per cubic meter of air
NFPA: National Fire Protection Association
NIOSH: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
OSHA: Occupational Safety and Health Administration
29 CFR 1910.134 & 1926.103: OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard
29 CFR 1910.1200 & 1926.59: OSHA Hazard Communication Standard
PEL: Permissable Exposure Limit
RCRA: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
SARA: Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act
Title III: Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act
Section 302: Extremely Hazardous Substances
Section 304: Emergency Release
Section 311: MSDS/List of Chemicals and Hazardous Inventory
Section 312: Emergency and Hazardous Inventory
Section 313: Toxic Chemicals and Release Reporting
SVF: Synthetic Vitreous Fiber
TLV: Threshold Limit Value (ACGIH)
TSCA: Toxic Substances Control Act

DISCLAIMER

The information presented herein is based on data considered to be accurate as of the date of preparation of this Material Safety Data Sheet. However, no warranty or representation, expressed or implied, is made as to the accuracy or completeness of the foregoing data and safety information. In addition, no responsibility can be assumed by vendor for any damage or injury resulting from abnormal use, from any failure to adhere to recommended practices, or from any hazards inherent in the nature of the product.